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Maryland Voter Services

Find up your polling place, look up your voter information, register online
Maryland State Board of Elections
Last updated: 9/27/2012

Not sure you are registered to vote? Want to look up your voter information? Visit the Maryland State Board of Elections Voter Services site.

Who can vote?

Any registered voter can vote. If you are not registered to vote, learn about how to register.

When can I vote?

You can either vote in person during early voting or on election day or by absentee ballot.

Early voting starts the 2nd Saturday before election day and runs through Thursday before the election, except for the Sunday during this time period. Each early voting center will be open continuously from 10 am to 8 pm each day. Find out where to vote early for the 2012 elections. Anyone in line at 8 pm will be allowed to vote.

On election day, you can vote at your assigned polling place. If you do not know where your polling place is, please visit our voter look-up website. On election day, polling places are open continuously from 7 am until 8 pm on. Anyone in line at 8 pm will be allowed to vote.

If you are unable to vote during early voting or on election day, you may vote by absentee ballot. Find out more information about absentee voting.

Where should I vote?

During early voting, you can vote at any early voting center in the jurisdiction where you live. Find out where the early voting center or centers are in your jurisdiction.

On election day, you should vote where you live. If your voter registration is up-to-date, you can refer to your Voter Notification Card for your precinct number and polling place location or use the voter look-up website. However, if you moved and have not updated your voter registration information, enter your new address in the Polling Place Locator. You will be required to vote a provisional ballot at the new polling place.

How will I cast my vote?

During early voting or on election day, you will vote on a touchscreen voting system. With a touchscreen voting system, you touch the screen to make, change, and review selections and cast a ballot.

There will be instructions available at the early voting centers and at your polling place to familiarize you with the ballot. You may ask an election judge to explain how to vote, but you must cast your vote alone, unless you are unable to do so because you have a disability or are unable to read or write the English language.

For absentee voting and provisional voting, you will use a paper-based optical scan voting system. With this system, you are issued a paper ballot and fill in the oval next to the candidate or ballot question response for which you want to vote. At the local board of elections, the ballot is fed into a scanning unit, which reads and tabulates the selections you made.

I have a disability. Will I be able to vote?

Yes. All of the early voting centers and the vast majority of polling places in Maryland are accessible to voters with disabilities. Find out if your polling place is accessible and if it is not, the reason or reasons why it is not. If your assigned polling place is not accessible to you, you may either vote during early votingrequest to be reassigned to an accessible polling place, or vote by absentee ballot.

If you vote during early voting or on election day, you will vote on a touchscreen voting system. This voting system allows for independent voting by most voters with disabilities. An audio ballot, magnified and contrasting text, and an adjustable touchscreen to accommodate voters who prefer to sit while voting are all available with this voting system.

If you need help to vote, you may select someone to help you. By law, your employer, an agent of your employer, an officer or agent of your union, or a challenger or watcher are not allowed to help you. An election judge may help you, but only in the presence of another election judge of a different political party.

Are election materials available in languages other than English?

Federal law requires Montgomery County to provide election materials in Spanish. Non-English materials may be provided in other jurisdictions on a voluntary basis. Contact your local board of elections to determine what is available in your jurisdiction.

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