Public Health

Resource | Public Health

What Stinks? Toxic Phthalates in your home

Industry information newly required by the State of Maine reveals that hormone-disrupting chemicals known as phthalates (THAL-eights) are found in
more household products than previously known. For the first time, the use of toxic phthalates has been reported in paints, cleaners, disinfectants
and deodorizers. It also has been reported in clothing, shoes, and personal care products.

Strong science shows that even at very low levels of exposure, phthalates--a class of more than 40 closely related chemicals--are linked to reproductive harm, learning disabilities, and asthma and allergies.

Resource | Public Health

Public Comments: Proposed Off-Gassing Regulation Changes

Did you know that Maryland's air quality is one of the worst in North America? Much of our state's ground level pollution is made up of toxic VOCs, or off-gassing.

This year, the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) proposed adopting an updated rule for Volatile Organic Compound (VOCs), which would apply to Maryland commercial and household products and would reduce off-gassing in the state by a projected 6.1 million tons per day. If approved, the regulations will be submitted to the EPA for approval as part of Maryland’s State Implementation Plan to further reduce ground level pollution.

 

Most of us think of ozone as a good thing – but that’s only partially true. Unlike the “good” ozone in the stratosphere that protects us, ground level or “bad” ozone is a colorless gas that forms just above the earth’s surface, where people, animals, and plants live and breathe.  Ground level ozone can cause airway inflammation even in healthy people and affects susceptible populations more.

 

Resource | Public Health

Maryland's proposed 2017 emissions regulations

Ground level ozone is pollution that sits just above the earth’s surface, causing poor air quality and contributing to respiratory issues. As the main component of smog, this type of pollution is not released into the atmosphere itself, but results from a reaction involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs), or ‘off-gassing.’

Tips for avoiding BPA in canned food

By | Juliana Bilowich
Public Health Organizer

Until we see federal policy reform and voluntary market-based solutions that provide people with the information they need to make safe and informed purchases of canned food, we recommend consumers do the following:

News Release | Maryland PIRG Foundation and others | Public Health

Two Out of Three Food Cans Tested Have Toxic BPA in Lining

“As a mother of five and someone who was raised on canned food, the thought that there could be toxic chemicals in the linings of some well-known canned foods is alarming,” said Delegate Angela Angel, representing District 25 in Prince George’s County. “Our food should provide nourishment, not harm.”

Campbell's Announces Plans to Phase out BPA from Cans

By | Juliana Bilowich
Public Health Organizer

Tomorrow we are releasing a new report on the use of BPA and other chemicals in canned food linings, including Campbell's. With interesting timing, last night Campbell's announced plans to phase out BPA from all of their cans.

Report | Breast Cancer Fund; Campaign for Healthier Solutions; Clean Production Action; Ecology Center; and Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families' Mind the Store Campaign (with support from Maryland PIRG and others) | Public Health

Buyer Beware

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a toxic, endocrine-disrupting chemical that negatively impacts our hormonal systems, contributing to a host of harmful health effects. Hundreds of scientific studies have linked extremely small amounts of BPA, measured in parts per billion and even parts per trillion, to an increased risk of breast and prostate cancer, infertility, type-2 diabetes, obesity, asthma, and behavioral changes including attention deficit disorder. It is likely that people are exposed to BPA from canned foods at levels that are compromising our health.

Media Hit | Public Health, Food

Will Yum! Brands Commit to Better Antibiotic Stewardship Policies?

"Despite these successes, we need to re-double our efforts to counter new threats from superbugs that increasingly diminish the effectiveness of antibiotics. We will continue to ramp up our consumer awareness and advocacy campaigns to ensure that the superbugs don't win."

Is your daily routine toxic?

By | Anna Low-Beer
Digital Campaigner

Because of a lack of regulation, many cosmetics and personal care products contain potentially toxic ingredients, like formaldehyde and lead acetate. What toxic chemicals might you encounter as you go about your daily routine? 

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