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Emily Scarr
Maryland PIRG State Director

Author: Emily Scarr

Maryland PIRG State Director

(410) 467-9389

Started on staff: 2005
B.A., Vassar College

Emily directs strategy, organizational development, research, communications and legislative advocacy for Maryland PIRG. Since joining Maryland PIRG in 2013, Emily has won reforms to strengthen our democrarcy, improve public health, and protect consumers.

She has helped lead efforts to establish small donor public financing programs throughout the state and helped update and modernize the small donor public financing program for Maryland candidates for governor. She has worked with partners to enable Election Day voter registration and automatic voter registration in Maryland. She spearheaded efforts to pass the Family and Firefighter Protection Act to ban flame retardants in children's products, furniture and mattresses, and the George "Walter" Taylor Act to restrict the use and disposal of toxic PFAS "forever chemicals." She lead efforts to pass the Maryland Keep Antibiotics Effective Act to protect public health by restricting the use of antibiotics on Maryland farms and the Safe School Drinking Water Act to require testing and remediation for lead in school drinking water.

Emily serves on the Executive Committees of the Maryland Fair Elections Coalition and the Maryland Campaign to Keep Antibiotics Working. She also serves on the Steering Committees for the Maryland Pesticide Action Network and Marylanders for Open Government. Emily lives in Baltimore with her husband, children, and dog.

As Maryland goes through the redistricting process, there have been a few changes in terms of dates, deadlines, and districts for the upcoming Maryland primary this summer. This post will walk through what you need to do to register to vote and submit your ballot in the primaries.

How to vote in a primary

Voting in the primaries is just like voting in the general election, with one major exception. You have to be a member of a political party if you want to vote in that party’s primary. In other words, voters who are registered as independent or 3rd party cannot vote in the Democratic nor the Republican primary elections. 

If you are a registered voter but you want to change your party registration, you can do so via a voter registration form. Just fill out the form and update your party affiliation! The deadline to update your party affiliation is Tuesday, July 19th for the 2022 primaries. 

 

How to register to vote/update your voter registration

There are a few different ways to register to vote or update your voter registration information: 

  1. Online

If you have a Maryland ID you can register to vote online using the Maryland State Board of Elections online voter registration form. This form allows you to register to vote; update your voter registration if your name, address, party affiliation, or other information has changed; and request a mail-in ballot. The deadline to register to vote online is Tuesday, June 28th for the 2022 primaries. 

  1. Mail

You can also fill out a physical voter registration form and send it to your local board of elections or the State Board of Elections. You should do this if you do not have a Maryland ID. These forms are available in multiple different languages, including in:

The mailing address for the State board of Elections is: P.O. Box 6486

Annapolis, MD 21401-0486

Similar to online voter registration, your voter registration application must be postmarked by Tuesday, June 28th in order to be eligible to vote in the 2022 primaries. 

  1. On Election Day

If you miss this deadline, you can also register to vote during early voting at any early voting center in your county or on Election Day at your polling station. You must bring a document that provides proof of address.

If you don’t receive a Voter Notification card three weeks after you submit your voter registration form, please contact your local board of elections. You can find their contact information here. You can also verify whether or not you are registered to vote online. 

 

How to vote by mail

To submit your ballot by mail, the first step is to ensure that you’re registered to vote. 

The Maryland State Board of Elections has already sent out mail-in ballot request forms to registered Maryland voters. You’ll receive a mail-in ballot if you follow the instructions included to return that form. However, if you hadn’t registered to vote by that time or you misplaced that form, you have a few other options to get a mail-in ballot.

  1. Online–you can request a mail-in ballot using an online form if you have a Maryland ID. 

  1. Mail–If you prefer to request by mail, or don’t have a Maryland ID, you can print out a mail-in ballot request form and mail it to your local board of elections. You can find the mailing address for every local board of election in Maryland here.

  1. In person–you can also visit your local board of elections and fill out a mail-in ballot request form in person. 

In most situations, the deadline to request an mail-in ballot for the 2022 primaries is July 12th. You can find more information about these deadlines on the State Board of Elections website.  

The State Board of Elections website also has an online resource which allows you to track the status of your mail-in ballot

Maryland has a new program called the permanent absentee ballot list. If you want to get a mail-in ballot for every future election, you can sign up for this list while requesting a mail-in ballot. Once you’re on the list, you’ll receive a ballot in the mail for every future election you are eligible to vote in without having to fill out a mail-in ballot request form for each election. 

 

How to vote in person

Due to redistricting, the primary dates have been pushed back. Early voting will now run from Thursday, July 7th to Thursday, July 14th including Saturday and Sunday. During this period, you can vote at any of the early voting locations in your county from 7 am to 8 pm. Early voting locations have not yet been released, but once publicized you can find that information on the State Board of Elections website.

The primary election day is Thursday, July 19th. You can vote at your assigned polling precinct anytime from 7 am to 8 pm. 

 

Redistricting

Maryland has adopted new district boundaries in response to the 2020 census in a process known as redistricting. As a result, you may live in a different district and have different representatives than you did in the last election. You can use the following resources to your  district for federal and state elections:

2022 Maryland Congressional Districts–Interactive Map

2022 Maryland State House Districts–Interactive Map

2022 Maryland State Senate Districts–Interactive Map 

 

Different counties are at different points in the redistricting process. You can find information about the local redistricting process and/or updated maps of local precincts in your county here:

Allegany County

Anne Arundel County

Baltimore County

Calvert County

Carroll County

Cecil County

Charles County

Dorchester County

Frederick County

Harford County

Howard County

Montgomery County

Prince George’s County

Queen Anne’s County

St. Mary’s County

Wicomico County

Emily Scarr
Maryland PIRG State Director

Author: Emily Scarr

Maryland PIRG State Director

(410) 467-9389

Started on staff: 2005
B.A., Vassar College

Emily directs strategy, organizational development, research, communications and legislative advocacy for Maryland PIRG. Since joining Maryland PIRG in 2013, Emily has won reforms to strengthen our democrarcy, improve public health, and protect consumers.

She has helped lead efforts to establish small donor public financing programs throughout the state and helped update and modernize the small donor public financing program for Maryland candidates for governor. She has worked with partners to enable Election Day voter registration and automatic voter registration in Maryland. She spearheaded efforts to pass the Family and Firefighter Protection Act to ban flame retardants in children's products, furniture and mattresses, and the George "Walter" Taylor Act to restrict the use and disposal of toxic PFAS "forever chemicals." She lead efforts to pass the Maryland Keep Antibiotics Effective Act to protect public health by restricting the use of antibiotics on Maryland farms and the Safe School Drinking Water Act to require testing and remediation for lead in school drinking water.

Emily serves on the Executive Committees of the Maryland Fair Elections Coalition and the Maryland Campaign to Keep Antibiotics Working. She also serves on the Steering Committees for the Maryland Pesticide Action Network and Marylanders for Open Government. Emily lives in Baltimore with her husband, children, and dog.