Vote By Mail in Maryland: What you need to know

Voting by mail is a safe and secure way to participate during the COVID-19 crisis, so everyone who can vote by mail should vote by mail.

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Emily Scarr
State Director

Author: Emily Scarr

State Director

(410) 467-9389

Started on staff: 2005
B.A., Vassar College

Emily directs strategy, organizational development, research, communications and legislative advocacy for Maryland PIRG. Recently, Emily helped win small donor public financing in Montgomery County, Howard County, Prince George's County, and Baltimore City; the Family and Firefighter Protection Act to ban flame retardants in children's products, furniture and mattresses; and, the Maryland Keep Antibiotics Effective Act to protect public health by restricting the use of antibiotics on Maryland farms. Emily serves on the Executive Committees of the Maryland Fair Elections Coalition, the Maryland Campaign to Keep Antibiotics Working, and the Maryland Tobacco Free Kids Coalition. She also serves on the Steering Committees for the Maryland Pesticide Action Network and Marylanders for Open Government. Emily lives in Baltimore with her husband, children, and dog.

Maryland's upcoming June 2nd primary elections are going to be conducted nearly entirely by vote-by-mail. Voting by mail is a safe and secure way to participate during the COVID-19 crisis, so everyone who can vote by mail should vote by mail. 

The process will be new to most Marylanders, so we want to ensure all eligible voters have the information they need to safely participate. The Board of Elections has made a video with instructions on the new system. Maryland PIRG also hosted a webinar discussion on the election process with Common Cause Maryland, Baltimore NAACP, MD ACLU, Disability Rights Maryland and other partners to discuss the impacts and details of vote by mail, you can watch the video here.

Vote by Mail: Details and Troubleshooting

  • Don’t get confused when you receive your ballot. The Maryland State Board of Elections announced that April 28 is printed on the top of the ballot even though the primary was moved to June 2nd. The primary election will take place on June 2, and your ballot will be counted as long as it is postmarked by June 2.
  • Unless you live in Baltimore, your ballot should have arrived by now. Baltimore ballots should arrive by May 22nd. To confirm you are registered and your ballot is on the way, visit the Board of Elections website, and if you haven’t received it by the 22nd you should contact your local Board of Elections. They will help you get a ballot. 
  • If you need to register to vote or update your registration with a new address or party you can do so online with state ID or by mail by May 27th. Same day voter registration WILL be available at voter centers on Election Day, for those who need it.

Vote by Mail: Tips on the Process

Vote by Mail: Helping Your Neighbors, Friends, and Family Vote

As always, we are doing everything we can to help voters, especially new voters, navigate the process. Here's how you can help ensure your friends and family are able to participate.

  1. The Globe at MICA has produced graphics to help spread the word about the election. You can print out signs to put in your car windows and share them on social media.
  2. Help them confirm their registration is up to date, and help them request an absentee ballot if they need one (deadline is May 27th).
  3. Ask if they received their ballot and help them follow up with local Board of Elections if they did not get one. 
  4. Remind them to mail in or drop off their ballot
  5. If all else fails, help them get to a vote center on Election Day or call the local Board of Elections to get a digital ballot.
Emily Scarr
State Director

Author: Emily Scarr

State Director

(410) 467-9389

Started on staff: 2005
B.A., Vassar College

Emily directs strategy, organizational development, research, communications and legislative advocacy for Maryland PIRG. Recently, Emily helped win small donor public financing in Montgomery County, Howard County, Prince George's County, and Baltimore City; the Family and Firefighter Protection Act to ban flame retardants in children's products, furniture and mattresses; and, the Maryland Keep Antibiotics Effective Act to protect public health by restricting the use of antibiotics on Maryland farms. Emily serves on the Executive Committees of the Maryland Fair Elections Coalition, the Maryland Campaign to Keep Antibiotics Working, and the Maryland Tobacco Free Kids Coalition. She also serves on the Steering Committees for the Maryland Pesticide Action Network and Marylanders for Open Government. Emily lives in Baltimore with her husband, children, and dog.