Resources

Resource | Food

A Year of Progress:

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and foods derived from GMO ingredients were introduced into U.S. markets comparatively recently, with the first such foods approved for commercial use twenty years ago.[i]  Yet the pace of adoption has been blistering.  As of 2013, 90% of the corn and 93% of the soy grown in the U.S. are GMO varieties, and by the mid-2000s, 87% of the domestic canola crop was genetically modified.[ii]

Because many of these crops are the source of ubiquitous food additives like high fructose corn syrup and soy and canola oils, the industry estimates that 70%-80% of the food Americans eat contains GMO ingredients.[iii]  However, this massive shift has mostly been invisible to consumers.  While 64 countries require the disclosure of GMO ingredients on food labels, the U.S. has yet to adopt mandatory GMO labeling.[iv]  Thus, while the USDA organic label does signify that a product is GMO-free, and there are voluntary GMO-free labeling efforts, American consumers are largely left in the dark.

Resource | Public Health

Toxics: Risks and Tips

Marylanders should have the tools to protect their children and families from toxic chemicals, and no child should have to face the long-term health effects that can result from chemical exposure.

Resource | Public Health

Change the Market - Support Antibiotic-free Restaurants

These restaurants have taken action to transition away from serving meat raised with antibiotics. 

Resource | Public Health

Open Letter to Subway

Read our letter to Subway, signed by nearly 60 public interest, medical, public health, environmental and animal welfare organizations, asking them to phase out meats produced with routine use of antibiotics.

Tips for Data Breach Victims

The first defense against any kind of identity theft is to be vigilant about protecting your personal information by taking steps like creating secure passwords, installing anti-virus and anti-malware software, and shredding personal documents.

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Poll: Which of these positive changes do you most want to see in 2020?
More restaurant chains commit to stopping their overuse of antibiotics.
Stop using Roundup, which has been linked to cancer, on our parks and playgrounds.
Ban the worst single-use plastics.



Maryland PIRG Foundation is part of The Public Interest Network, which operates and supports organizations committed to a shared vision of a better world and a strategic approach to getting things done.